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Pop-up Phishing Attack on MetaMask Users Visiting Popular Crypto Sites

As if this week weren’t bad enough for many cryptocurrency owners, with stablecoins crashing and Coinbase suffering an outage at a particularly bad time, now they’ve reportedly been targeted by a new phishing attack. As reported by CoinDesk and The Block Crypto, sites including Etherscan, CoinGecko, and DexTools all warned users that they were aware…

As if this week wasn’t enough, with stablecoins going down , and Coinbase experiencing an outage during a particularly difficult time ,, now it appears that they have been targeted by a new Phishing attack. As reported by CoinDesk and The Block Crypto, sites including Etherscan, CoinGecko, and DexTools all warned users that they were aware of suspicious popups appearing for visitors, and advised them not to confirm any transactions based on popups.

This phishing scam, like many others, promised a link to Bored Ape Yacht Club, featuring a logo of an ape skull and a domain called nftapes.win. It asked users to connect their MetaMask wallets, which allows access to your phone or browser extension, to the site. This domain was trusted by many and may have been a fallacy.

Update: The situation is caused by a malicious ad script by Coinzilla, a crypto ad network – we have disabled it now but there may be some delay due to CDN caching. We will continue to monitor the situation. Keep an eye on the situation and don’t connect your Metamask to CoinGecko. https://t.co/NY0ppKecIG

— CoinGecko (@coingecko) May 13, 2022

Last November, the security company Check Point Research identified a phishing attack that used Google Ads that would either attempt to steal someone’s credentials or trick them into logging into the attacker’s wallet so that it would receive any transactions they attempted. In February, a phishing attack stole $1.7 million worth of NFTs from OpenSea users, while a more recent attempt via Discord only snagged $18,000 worth of tokens.

Etherscan said it has disabled third-party integrations for the time being. A tweet from CoinGecko identified the source of the malicious popup as Coinzilla, an industry advertising network that told customers it could deliv

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