Categories: keepsZello

How Zello keeps people connected during South Africa’s unrest

On June 29, former South African president Jacob Zuma was sentenced to 15 months in prison for corruption during his presidency. Zuma—the first ethnic Zulu to hold the country’s highest office—has a loyal following. He also has many detractors, who blame his administration’s corruption for a stagnant economy and weakened democracy.

Zuma didn’t turn himself in until July 7, saying he was innocent and that jail could kill him at 79 years old. Within hours, protests and widespread looting, particularly in his home city of Durban, were reported as supporters stationed themselves around his compound and challenged police. That violence has led to at least 215 deaths and more than 2,500 arrests.

For South Africans like Amith Gosai, keeping track of what was happening on the ground was hard. His WhatsApp chats were flooded and confusing. Then he saw a note on his community WhatsApp group urging neighbors to join a sort of neighborhood watch channel on Zello, a “walkie-talkie” app that is fast becoming a tool for protest communication. 

“This helped us tremendously to create awareness around the community as well as to quell fears,” Gosai told me via Twitter DM. 

Gosai, who is also from Durban, was among 180,000 people who downloaded Zello in the wake of Zuma’s arrest. Users subscribe to channels to talk to each other, sending live audio files that are accessible to anyone listening in on the channel.

Zello was originally designed to help people communicate and organize after natural disasters. With Wi-Fi or a data connection, people can use it to broadcast their location, share tips, and communicate with rescuers or survivors in the aftermath of a hurricane, flood, or other emergency. In the US, Zello found traction in 2017’s Hurricane Harvey rescue efforts. The app is also used by taxi drivers, ambulance workers, and delivery personnel who want to send hands-free voice messages, according to Raphael Varieras, Zello’s vice president of operations, says. Because Zello is a voice-first platform, it’s faster than typing and requires no literacy skills. 

But recent events suggest that use of Zello is increasingly being used to connect people in areas of unrest as well. Within hours of the most recent Israeli-Palestinian conflict, downloads skyrocketed to 100 times their usual rate, for example. And Cuba also saw a spike in downloads amid protests over shortages of food and medicine. Unsurprisingly, this development has prompted some countries to ban the app, including China, Venezuela, and Syria.

Without a formal emergency response system like the US’s 911, South Africans have been increasingly turning to Zello to coordinate ad hoc ambulances and neighborhood patrols. One channel, South Africa Community Action Network, boasts 11,600 paying mem

Read More

News Bot

Share
Published by
News Bot
Tags: keepsZello

Recent Posts

With moratorium lifting, can US avoid avalanche of evictions?

With the federal eviction moratorium expiring this weekend, tenants and housing advocates are braced. Just…

12 mins ago

Safe passage: More Afghan aides relocated to U.S.

Washington The first flight evacuating Afghans who worked alongside Americans in Afghanistan brought more than…

12 mins ago

‘I need to vote.’ Why more Asian Americans are staking a political claim.

Voter turnout by Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders increased in the 2020 election more than…

12 mins ago

How to Make Your Amazon Echo Listen for Specific Sounds

AmazonAmong its 100,000+ skills, Alexa includes a Sound Detection feature, which allows it to listen…

12 mins ago

What Are Docker Volumes, and How Do You Use Them?

Oct 23, 2020, 8:00 am EDT | 3 min read By default, Docker containers are…

12 mins ago

The ISS is Now Stable After Docked Russian Module Unexpectedly Fired Thrusters

News @yeah_books Jul 30, 2021, 2:30 pm EDT | 1 min read NASARussia’s “Nauka” Multipurpose…

12 mins ago